Food Safety Modernization Act

Contents

Food Safety Modernization Act Educational Workshops

The Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), signed into law in 2011, gives the Federal Food & Drug Administration (FDA) broad new authority over many types of food production, processing, and distribution. In addition to giving FDA greater recall authority, FSMA charged FDA with establishing rules to prevent foodborne illness and protect public health. These seven rules are now final and in the process of being implemented. FSMA represents the largest overhaul of federal food safety laws since 1938.

FSMA Educational Resources

In 2015 & 2016, the Federal Food & Drug Administration (FDA) finalized seven rules to implement FSMA. To view the full list of final FDA FSMA rules, visit the FDA’s FSMA Rules & Guidance for Industry.

On December 14, 2015, the Vermont Agency of Agriculture hosted FDA Deputy Commissioner for Foods & Veterinary Medicine Mike Taylor along with FDA subject matter experts for an overview of three final FSMA rules: Preventive Controls for Human Food, Produce Safety, and Preventive Controls for Animal Food. Links to FDA's presentations and meeting audio are below. 

Standards for the Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption

This rule, also known as the “Produce Safety Rule,” covers the production of raw agricultural commodities that are commonly consumed raw, such as strawberries, lettuce, melons, and spinach.

Learn more about the Produce Safety Rule:

Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Human Food

This rule is also known as the “Preventive Controls Rule” and addresses facilities that process food for human consumption, including value-added production on farm and at food hubs.

Learn more about the Preventative Controls Rule:

Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for Food for Animals

This rule is also known as the “Feed Rule” and applies to manufacturers of domestic and imported animal food, including pet food, animal feed, and raw materials and ingredients.

Learn more about the Feed Rule:

VAAFM has worked closely with FDA to ensure final rules that are feasible for the small-scale diversified agriculture that is critical to the food system in Vermont and New England and remains committed to protecting the Vermont brand and its reputation for quality.

Visit the Vermont Produce Safety page to learn more about VAAFM’s leadership role in the federal rulemaking process and our plans to provide outreach, education, and technical assistance to producers as they prepare for FSMA implementation and industry-wide changes.

Vermont Produce Safety Survey

If you grow, harvest, pack, or hold fresh produce for human consumption, you may be impacted by the FDA's Produce Safety Rule. This rule covers the growing, harvesting, packing and holding of raw agricultural commodities that are commonly consumed raw, such as strawberries, lettuce, melons, and spinach. FDA defines produce as any fruit or vegetable—including mixes of intact fruits and vegetables—as well as mushrooms, sprouts (irrespective of seed source), peanuts, tree nuts, and herbs. 

Visit www.surveymonkey.com/r/vtfsma to take the survey and learn about how your farm may be impacted by FDA’s Produce Safety Rule or call Kristina Sweet at (802) 522-7811 to complete the survey over the phone

  • Who? All Vermont farmers who grow, harvest, pack, or hold fresh produce—even if primarily engaged in another type of farming—should take this survey.
  • What? The Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets (VAAFM) designed this survey to help farmers determine if they will be impacted by FDA’s Produce Safety Rule, understand their requirements under the rule, and learn about compliance timelines. The Produce Safety Rule, a rule under the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), is now final and will be implemented over the next 1 to 5 years. 
  • Why? Information collected through this survey will help VAAFM understand how farms in Vermont will be impacted by the Produce Safety Rule and better assist farmers in preparing for implementation of the rule.  
  • How? In order to complete this survey, you will need estimates of your farm, business, or organization's annual sales of (a) produce and (b) all food—including animal feed. You will also need general knowledge of your farm, business, or organization’s food safety practices. 

This survey will take approximately 8-10 minutes to complete and is divided into two sections. Section I will help to determine whether you may be subject to Produce Safety Rule, and Section II asks about your farm's food safety practices and certifications so that we may better understand how market demand for produce safety impacts farms in Vermont. 

Contact Kristina Sweet at kristina.sweet@vermont.gov or (802) 522-7811 with comments or questions about this survey.

Additional FSMA Resources

Resources at UVM Extension

Regional & National Resources

Media Releases

Comments on Proposed FSMA Rules

Contact

General Inquiries
Kristina Sweet
Produce Program Coordinator
(802) 522-7811
Kristina.Sweet@vermont.gov
 
Media Inquiries
Alison Kosakowski
Communications Director
(802) 828-2430